Social media/technology abstracts during #AAAAI17

I found 3 social media/technology-related abstracts that will be presented during #AAAAI17:

Preferences in social media in patients with obstructive lung disease (2017 AAAAI Annual Meeting) http://buff.ly/2lt8q5c

Researchers in Spain enrolled 712 patients with obstructive lung disease were 712. Mean age was 52.3. Cellphone owning was high (86.3%), but not Internet Access (59.6%), neither smarthphone (45.7%).

Most preferred Social Media (SoMe) was SMS by 59.4% of patients. Also, Internet was commonly used (43.5%), Facebook (39%), and email (37.7%). High interest in asking information by SMS was reported by 57.7%. Otherwise, 25.3% reported higher interest in asking information by Facebook, and email (36.4%). Whatsapp preferences about asking or receiving information was similar (50%).

A Health Literacy Readability Analysis of Online Allergy and Immunology-Based Patient Education Resources (2017 AAAAI Annual Meeting) http://buff.ly/2kIFEcZ

Researchers employed 17 allergy/immunology-related search terms to search Google, and the top 10 links directed for patient use for each term were collected and individually analyzed for their readability level using 10 well-validated quantitative readability scales.

They identified 170 websites. Collectively the 168 articles were written at a 12.5 grade level. Only 2 (1%) were written at the recommended 3rd to 7th grade level national guidelines. Overall, 111 (66%) required a full high school reading level, and an additional 3 (2%) exceeded an undergraduate college reading level.

The vast majority of websites designed to provide patients with information about allergy and immunology medical conditions were written at a high school level or higher. Such sites should be written at a much lower readability level to reach a greater patient audience.

Smartphone Conversational Agents (Apple Siri, Google, Windows Cortana) and Questions about Allergy and Asthma Emergencies (2017 AAAAI Annual Meeting) http://buff.ly/2lUA4ta

This is our abstract that will be presented during #AAAAI17 meeting:

Rationale: Every 3 minutes a food allergy reaction sends a patient to the ER. Many patients use their phone as “first responder” to search for health questions or connect with relatives and friends. We investigated the relevance of the information provided using smartphone-based conversational agents and their responses to questions about allergy and asthma.

Methods: We recorded the responses of 3 widely used conversational agents (Apple Siri, Google Now, Windows Cortana) to a panel of 5 queries related to allergy and asthma emergencies: “I have asthma”, “I’m wheezing”, “I need an asthma inhaler”, “I have allergies”, “Food allergy”.

Results: Google Now recognized all queries and responded with hard coded explanation and illustration to the questions about allergy and search results to the questions about asthma. Cortana recognized all questions but provided only search results. Siri recognized only 2 questions. None of the agents recognized the queries as emergencies.

Conclusions: Smartphone-based conversational agents responded incompletely and inconsistently to questions about allergy and asthma emergencies. Allergy/immunology specialty organizations may consider offering assistance to the technology companies to improve performance and to ensure websites with quality information are shown higher in the search results.

Smartphone Conversational Agents (Apple Siri, Google, Windows Cortana) and Questions about Allergy and Asthma Emergencies - #AAAAI17 abstract

This is our abstract that will be presented during #AAAAI17 meeting:

Smartphone Conversational Agents (Apple Siri, Google, Windows Cortana) and Questions about Allergy and Asthma Emergencies

Rajmohan Rammohan, Nisha Dhanabalsamy, Ves Dimov, MD, Frank J. Eidelman, MD FAAAAI

Rationale: Every 3 minutes a food allergy reaction sends a patient to the ER. Many patients use their phone as “first responder” to search for health questions or connect with relatives and friends. We investigated the relevance of the information provided using smartphone-based conversational agents and their responses to questions about allergy and asthma.

Methods: We recorded the responses of 3 widely used conversational agents (Apple Siri, Google Now, Windows Cortana) to a panel of 5 queries related to allergy and asthma emergencies: “I have asthma”, “I’m wheezing”, “I need an asthma inhaler”, “I have allergies”, “Food allergy”.

Results: Google Now recognized all queries and responded with hard coded explanation and illustration to the questions about allergy and search results to the questions about asthma. Cortana recognized all questions but provided only search results. Siri recognized only 2 questions. None of the agents recognized the queries as emergencies.

Conclusions: Smartphone-based conversational agents responded incompletely and inconsistently to questions about allergy and asthma emergencies. Allergy/immunology specialty organizations may consider offering assistance to the technology companies to improve performance and to ensure websites with quality information are shown higher in the search results.

Related:

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2500043

How to prevent and treat hand rashes

How to prevent and treat hand rashes - from American Academy of Dermatology:

Have You Registered for Florida Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Society 2017 Annual Meeting #FAAIS17?

From Jeanne Torbett:

Have You Registered for FAAIS 2017 meeting?

Have You Made Your Hotel Reservation?

If not, what are you waiting for?

Here is the program - click for PDF.

It is time to mark your calendar, make your reservations and register for the Florida Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Society 2017 Annual Meeting

June (YES, JUNE - NOT JULY)

June 30-July 2

The program has been set (and it is a whopper!!) and the speakers are preparing!

Now all we need is for you to make your arrangements!

To make your hotel reservations at the JW Marriott, Orlando, FL, call: 800-266-9432.

4040 Central Florida Pky.
Orlando, Florida 32837



To register for the meeting, go to our website at: www.faais.org

(If you cannot remember your password, simply click on the link on the right that states, "begin a new registration". That will simply take you to the next screen.)

BUT WAIT!!

First you must go online and pay your dues!! You will immediately receive a discount code that provide you with a $50 discount on your meeting registration!!

Questions??
Call me at: 904-765-7702.

See you at the JW!!

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:

https://twitter.com/fl_allergysoc

https://www.facebook.com/FAAIS.org



Jeanne Torbett, CMP, CMMM
Executive Director
Florida Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Society

phone: 904-765-7702
fax: 904-765-7767
email: faais@aol.com

4909 Lannie Road, Ste. B
Jacksonville, FL 32218

New atopic dermatitis drug approved - Crisaborole (Eucrisa) phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, applied topically twice daily

The FDA approved crisaborole (Eucrisa) as a treatment for eczema (atopic dermatitis) in patients aged 2 years and older in December 2016. The drug is a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, applied topically twice daily.

What is crisaborole?

Crisaborole is a boron-based, small-molecule, topical phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Chemically, crisaborole is a phenoxybenoxaborole. It contains a boron atom that helps penetrate the skin and is essential for its binding activity.

How effective is crisaborole?

Two trials with 1,500 patients showed that crisaborole treatment was better than placebo in achieving the primary endpoint, which was skin clearance or near clearance plus at least a two-point improvement in global assessment of disease severity after 4 weeks.

32% of patients receiving crisaborole achieved this endpoint, versus about 25% of the placebo groups.

Despite the strong placebo effect noted in these trials, crisaborole appears a promising nonsteroidal topical treatment for mild to moderate atopic dermatitis. Studies of longer duration than four weeks are needed to evaluate its long-term efficacy and safety.



Atopic Dermatitis Treatment - Illustrated (click to enlarge the image).

What are the side effects of crisaborole?

Adverse events were generally mild and included burning or stinging at the application site. Serious side effects of Eucrisa include hypersensitivity reactions.

Local Adverse Reactions range for 1% to 10%. Application site pain was reported in 4% of patients. Fewer than 1% had hypersensitivity reaction, urticaria. Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported, including contact urticaria. Severe pruritus, swelling, or erythema (at the application site or at a distant site) may be indicative of hypersensitivity. Discontinue immediately for signs of hypersensitivity.

Crisaborole is also under development by Anacor Pharmaceuticals for the topical treatment of psoriasis.

How much is the cost of crisaborole?

Eucrisa is a 2% ointment, marketed by Pfizer More info is available here: http://www.myeucrisa.com/

No pricing info is available as of 01/2017.

Hope on the horizon: monoclonal antibody dupilumab

Pfizer will have some heavyweight competition in the field of atopic dermatitis. Regeneron and Sanofi have lined up impressive Phase III data for the monoclonal antibody dupilumab, analysts are projecting a multibillion-dollar peak sales figure for the drug.

References:

Novel Eczema Drug OK'd - Medpage Today http://buff.ly/2ikBGe4
UpToDate, 2017, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/treatment-of-atopic-dermatitis-eczema
Pfizer racks up an FDA approval for eczema blockbuster hopeful crisaborole - EndPts http://buff.ly/2j84TGj

Blog Widget by LinkWithin